Andy

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Posted about 4 years ago in by
Spaghetti Dinner

Interested in food, music, and a good cause? Come to the HOINA Spaghetti Dinner tomorrow evening to satisfy these three interests and more.


The price of $7 includes dinner, dessert, and live instrumental music, ranging from a viola quartet to traditional Indian kirtans.


Homes of the Indian Nation (HOINA) is a nonprofit organization which runs an orphanage and school in Andhra Pradesh, India. All proceeds from the fundraiser will directly benefit the orphans themselves.


Learn more about the event after the jump.

Posted about 4 years ago in by
Earth

Tonight at 8:30, several Penn State landmarks will go dark in celebration of the fourth annual Earth Hour.


The World Wildlife Fund (WWF) started the Earth Hour tradition in 2007 to recognize the climate change caused by excessive energy consumption. International landmarks, such as the Eiffel Tower and Golden Gate Bridge, will go unlit for one hour tonight as a symbolic gesture.


Participating Penn State locales include Old Main, the Lion Shrine, the Nittany Lion Inn, and the IST Building, reports Penn State Live.


Tonight, turn off the lights and power down the computer. Sit down and talk to your roommates and friends. Sing songs. Gaze at the moon. Go for a walk. Be grateful for the ample electricity available in America, and appreciate your general existence.

Posted about 4 years ago in by

Hip-hop duo Chiddy Bang will perform at Sigma Chi fraternity on Thursday, April 8. The show is part of Sigma Chi’s week-long philanthropy, Derby Days, and proceeds will benefit the Huntsman Cancer Foundation.


Chiddy Bang is well-known for sampling indie artists in their mashups. Check out “Opposite of Adults,” featuring beats by MGMT. Tickets will be $10 and available for sale sometime next week. See the Facebook event for more details.


Posted about 4 years ago in by
Porn_Nation_Mode

Michael Leahy, recovering porn addict, says “yes.”


At a presentation titled “Porn Nation,” Leahy spoke last night at Eisenhower Auditorium about living in a hypersexual culture.


He explained that pornography teaches men to expect  dominance in sexual relationships. According to porn, women must be sexy, submissive, and ready to satisfy men at all times.


This warped version of reality subsumes the minds of porn-watchers, whether they realize it or not. Men enter relationships expecting sex-on-demand. And if they don’t get it, Leahy says they watch more porn, and the cycle continues until women become mere pleasure machines to the porn enthusiast.

Posted about 4 years ago in by
Spring Creek Canyon
The Spring Creek Canyon area consists of 1,800 acres currently owned by the PA Department of Corrections. Everyone seems to want a piece, and negotiations have stumbled along for the past few years. Now, a final agreement has been reached. Read on for the full details, as well as the controversy behind it.
Posted about 4 years ago in about
by
commonwealth
Seven months ago, Penn State launched a "strategic plan" to deal with the challenges of operating a research university in the worrisome economic climate. One facet of this plan seeks to ease the transition for Commonwealth students transferring to University Park. The University has formed a steering committee to improve these student transitions and has increased the flow of information to Commonwealth students considering such a transition. Read on for more comments and details.
Posted about 4 years ago in by
SHC
Honors colleges offer the resources of a large research university and the community of a small liberal arts college. See any honors college brochure for a similar pitch. Over 70 such establishments have appeared throughout the country, and their numbers have grown quickly since the mid-1990s, says the Chronicle of Higher Education. The South Carolina Honors College ranks among the best in the nation. Mary Anne Fitzpatrick, a university dean, explains that the honors college "really attempts to focus on providing that elite, liberal-arts-college experience." South Carolina honors students live in a separate dormitory, complete a senior thesis, and enroll in seminar-esque honors courses. This neatly parallels our Schreyer Honors College, my personal favorite among such institutions. According to the National Collegiate Honors Council, most honors colleges use the "best of both worlds" recruitment pitch. Such a pitch rings true. The Schreyer Honors College makes an excellent Penn State education even better.
Posted about 4 years ago in by
card

ARHS and UPUA have accepted the fact that Penn Staters drink. With the help of new information cards, they’re striving to get students home safely.


The cards display phone numbers for three taxi services, the number for the campus escort service, and a miniature CATA bus schedule. The front and back are shown here.




Steve Roberts, associate vice president of Association of Residence Hall Students (ARHS), conceived the idea of the cards in light of the recent State Patty’s Day. We contacted Mr. Roberts for an explanation of these cards.

“The cards are printed on cardstock and thus are durable. Additionally, they are not in the traditional format of a flyer or larger piece of paper which would typically be thrown out. The cards are about the size of a normal business card and slide easily into your wallet or purse so that when students go out it’s not a hassle to bring it with them.”



In addition, he says that several bars and apartments have already requested information cards to distribute to students.


At my floor meeting last night, my RA passed around a stack of these cards. My floormates agreed that while the front side may prove useful, the reverse side is laughably illegible due to the minuscule font size.


This initiative is a great idea, and I hope it succeeds. However, a bit of advice for the lost drunkard in need of transportation: call a taxi, don’t wait for the bus. It’s highly probable that you can’t decipher the font.

Posted about 4 years ago in by
people
Late last week, we asked if the pendulum was swinging on State Patty's. Our answer? A loud, albeit slurred, "NO!" State College police handled roughly 365 calls related to State Patty's Day. University Police dealt with another 55 calls. This wasn't your average Saturday. Penn Live reports that the arrest count doubled from last year, jumping from 80 to 160 arrests. Between 6 pm Friday and 6 pm Sunday, Centre LifeLink EMS responded to 58 calls.
Posted about 4 years ago in by
Movin On' 1975
As you may know, the 36th annual Movin' On is happening on April 17. As you may not know, the musical festival has a rich history starting in the yonder year of 1974. Back in the day, the East Halls Residence Association held a primordial Movin' On at the fields by Beaver Stadium, where students jammed to area bands and watched W.C. Fields and Marx Brothers movies. The event was then called "Good Feelings '74," a name which I definitely dig. In 1975, the event's organizers joined the Association of Residence Hall Students (ARHS) and tremendously expanded the festival. Each day of the week, a different group of dorms presented a day of activities, collectively known as "Penn State's Greatest Week of Entertainment." The week culminated in the epic day-long Movin' On concert (for the record, the phrase "Movin' On" acknowledges the seniors who are "movin' on" after graduation). Eventually the week-long event evolved into a two-day audio extravaganza. The organizers extended Movin' On to a two-day concert in 1976. A local radio station played a live broadcast of the acts, and Movin' On raised money for the Volunteer Service Center for the second year in a row. Orleans played in '77; Gregg Allman played in '78. Again, Movin' On outlives The Spill Canvas and The White Tie Affair. Check out the Facebook event, and get ready to "move on" this April.
Posted about 4 years ago in by
On their website/newspaper/blog, the Huffington Post recently launched a "College" section, where they publish the work of selected college media outlets. Why am I telling you this? Because they selected Onward State as a partner! Our "THON in Review" article appeared on the Huffington Post yesterday, much to everyone's delight. To get hyped for this new affiliation, we've added a HuffPo widget on the right side of our page. This new phase of our bloghood is big news for us here at Onward State. @Writers, we'll have to step up our game. Davis' so-called "duopoly" has erupted into a monopolistic competition, so we'll have to differentiate our product in order to succeed. @Readers, post exemplary comments; the whole world may see them! In case any of you fine folks really dig the Huffington Post, answer their call for citizen journalists. They'll be recruiting "about 30 students, both photojournalists and videographers, to cover college issues.... There will be weekly assignments, training events, crowdsourcing projects, and most importantly, daily access to HuffPost editors." If interested, click here to apply.
Posted about 4 years ago in by
mean girls

In 2007, the National Study of Student Hazing found that 68 percent of women in Greek life experience hazing before joining their sororities. Penn State is not immune from this barbaric behavior. Serious reports of hazing have recently been reported at Penn State Altoona.


ABC News reports that “Joanne” pledged a Penn State Altoona sorority and suffered from severe hazing. Her potential sisters made her clean the kitchen floor with her fingernails. They screamed about her worthlessness, threw her against brick walls, and forced her to drink black, dirty water. When Joanne finally quit, the girls keyed her car and left scathing messages on her Facebook profile.


Along with most colleges, Penn State Altoona strictly prohibits hazing, yet it happens nonetheless. Hazing frequently includes labeling areas of fat on girls’ bodies with marker and “boob ranking,” in which girls are rendered topless and ordered by their breast sizes.


Obviously, this is awful behavior, and the fact that it occurs causes me to question the decency of my fellow college students. Hazing has probably occurred for a long time, but why have young women recently become so violent and hateful? I look to overzealous feminism and the bawdiness of reality TV for answers.


Sororities should bond through unity and accomplishment, not mental trauma. To any hazers out there, remember the moral pillars that support your establishments.

Posted about 4 years ago in by
Gene Baur
In 1986, Gene Baur took a stand against the exploitation of our fellow animals. He founded Farm Sanctuary, an organization which promotes animal welfare laws, rescues farm animals from slaughter, and shelters these animals in upstate New York and northern California. Mr. Baur recently authored Farm Sanctuary: Changing Hearts and Minds about Animals and Food, a national bestseller. He and his organization strive to improve conditions in factory farms and slaughterhouses. They recently won legislative victories in California, which has since banned various confinement systems and outlawed the force-feeding of ducks and geese to produce foie gras. A dynamic orator, Gene Baur will speak tonight at 7 pm in the Kern Building. See the Facebook event for more details. Herbivores, omnivores, and carnivores alike should attend this event. You may gain an ethical perspective about what's really on your plate.
Posted about 4 years ago in by
library
A quartet of wealthy alumni just donated $2.5 million to the Penn State University Libraries. This gift set a new donation record and will support the Pattee Library's new Knowledge Commons. A major upcoming renovation, the Knowledge Commons will act as an information technology center within the library. Jeanette and John R. McWhirter and Ann and Peter G. Tombros are the generous donors behind these funds. Read the Penn State Live article for the details regrading their fascinating (and financially rewarding) career trajectories. In addition to the joint gift of $2.5 million, the Tombros couple has offered $1.4 million to improve the University Libraries' collections of Classics and Greek Literature. This fortunate turn of events is excellent news for our libraries. May the manifestations of these gifts expand our knowledge as university students.
Posted about 4 years ago in by
shea

Those of you who read the Collegian on Tuesday probably read about Dennis Shea, head of the Department of Health Policy and Administration and staunch objector to State Patty’s Day. For you devout Onward Staters, you may know Dr. Shea better as the prolific commenter “GTWMA.”


To the average college student, GTWMA may seem like a stringent fun-sucker beamed to the future from the temperance days of yore. But when compared to the shamrock-covered sloppy messes drunk at 10 am, the enlightened Dr. Shea wins the allegiance of many.


Dr. Shea has gained a following; the End The “State Patty’s Day” Tradition Facebook group has amassed over 1,185 members (although the “official” State Patty’s Day group has 9,390 members, roughly a quarter of the student body).


Read on for more.

Posted about 4 years ago in by
Penn_Stater_Jazz
The audience roared with applause and offered a standing ovation to the sextet, who graced the stage once again for an encore. The touring Monterey Jazz Festival performed in Eisenhower Auditorium last night, and they delighted the audience with intricate, energized melodies. The sextet included singer Kurt Elling, guitarist Russell Malone, violinist Regina Carter, bassist […]
Posted about 4 years ago in by
AP
Advanced Placement tests offer a number of advantages to high school students, including weighted GPAs and college credit. More students take AP tests these days, but more students fail them. According to USA Today, AP enrollment jumped from 704,000 to 1.7 million students between 1999 and 2009. However, failing scores, defined as a 1 or 2 out of 5, rose from 36.5% to 41.5%. Students' performances have shifted unevenly. Scores for AP Physics have generally increased, while scores for AP English Literature have dropped (reflecting the world's new infatuation with math and science). Geography may also affect the high fail rates. In the South (roughly Texas to Delaware), nearly half of all AP tests earned a failing grade. This represents a significant statistical difference from the rest of the country. New Mexico, Arkansas, Mississippi, and West Virginia contain the lowest scoring test-takers. In those four states, AP test-takers failed between 55% and 70.3% of all exams. Yikes. AP credits fulfill many general education requirements and can improve one's college career immensely. Fewer gen eds can equate to early graduation and thousands of saved dollars. Fewer gen eds can also free up precious college time to take fascinating yet semi-irrelevant courses of one's choice. The rigor of AP courses surely differs from high school to high school. However, an AP test fee is a great investment—as long as you pass the test. See Penn State's AP course equivalencies for more details.
Posted about 4 years ago in by
After millennia of a male-dominated world, women have finally risen to the top. But some college admissions officers suggest that they've risen too high. Women now outnumber men applying to and graduating from college. They comprise 57% of college populations, and they may face discrimination for being too eager for a college education. The College of William and Mary accepted relatively equal numbers of men and women for the most recent freshman class. However, 7,652 women and 4,457 men applied. Crunch those numbers, and you'll find that the college accepted 45% of male applicants and only 27% of female applicants. The U.S. Commission on Civil Rights recently caught wind of this inequality, and they're seeing if universities are deliberately discriminating against women to maintain an equal gender ratio. The phenomenon of female-dominated universities has yet to strike Penn State. Men represent 54% of the student body, while females represent only 46%. Penn State may be an exception due to its respected College of Engineering, one institute that oozes testosterone. In any case, discrimination against college-bound women is intolerable. Rather than slackening standards for male applicants, colleges should alter certain structures to increase male enrollment. (Adderral dispensers in the library? Free ESPN Insider accounts for all students?) But seriously, alternatives to blatant discrimination surely exist. (Although, as a man, a high female-to-male ratio is fine by me.)
Posted about 4 years ago in by
The 2010 Census is upon us, and five Penn State students are determined to count every man, woman, and child in Centre County. Laura Peck, Jennifer Wallington, Emily Franklin, Kate Wiedie, and Emily Simmons formed "Count Centre County" to compete in this year's Public Relations Student Society of America's National Bateman Competition. They're especially targeting groups with low return rates, namely rural populations and college students. Count Centre County, a community outreach organization, will host informative events during the month of February to maximize the county's participation in the Census this year. The group will make appearances in the HUB and residence halls, so be sure to participate. Students comprise roughly three quarters of State College, so a lack of Census participation on our part could drastically alter the results for Centre County. Check out the group's Facebook and Twitter pages for more details.
Posted about 4 years ago in by
policemen

You may have spent your Friday night drinking alcohol or smoking marijuana while on the lookout for those pesky police. They’re always trying to spoil your fun, right?


To get a policeman’s perspective, I tagged along with a university cop while he made his Friday rounds. For security’s sake, I can’t mention names or places, but here’s what happened on my journey to the other side. As students, you may expect police officers to be gruff, handcuff-happy jerks, but Officer X was a wonderful guy. The police don’t go out of their way to bust people; they merely strive to keep the students safe, even if that means slapping citations onto a few unlucky law-breakers.

Posted about 4 years ago in by
rachel petkac

Rachel Petkac, 19, passed away on Monday night after sustaining severe injuries from an automobile accident. A commuter, Ms. Petkac was driving back from Penn State on Friday, January 8 at the time of the accident.


She lost control of her vehicle in the snow on Route 550. Her car collided with a utility pole. After 18 days of hospitalization, she died at Geisinger Medical Center. See this CDT briefing for more details.


Ms. Petkac was a Schreyer scholar majoring in Community, Environment, and Development. She graduated from State College Area High School in 2008. She was a member of the Good Shepard Catholic Church and planned on joining the Peace Corps after college. For more information, see her full obituary and commemorative Facebook group.

Posted about 4 years ago in by
ice cream
Have you always wanted to rival the Creamery with your ice-cream-making prowess? Your chance has arisen! This weekend, the College of Agricultural Sciences is hosting "Ice Cream 101: Introduction to Frozen Desserts," a compact course that teaches the basics of ice cream composition, formulation, and processing. Taught by past and present Penn State faculty, the course involves both lectures and hands-on exercises. According to the website, ice cream lovers, small-business owners, and entrepreneurs are welcome to attend. When: Saturday, 7:45 am - Sunday, 5:30 pm Where: Agricultural Science and Industries Building Cost: $695 Yes, this two-day class actually costs $695. But if you truly love frozen flavored pasteurized homogenized bovine mammary secretions, it's worth every penny.
Posted about 5 years ago in by
money

In December 2005, alumni and friends of Penn State donated $44.4 million. Sounds like a lot, right? This past December, those alumni and friends donated over $58 million, setting a new fundraising record (in a single month) for Penn State.


President Spanier had the following comment, according to Penn State Live: “Our donors continue their loyalty to Penn State, and we are most grateful to each of them for their exceedingly generous support, which is essential to the University’s future.”


Of the December total, 31,000 donors gave over 37,000 gifts. Eleven of these gifts surpassed $1 million.


Penn State hopes that this new record will fit into an upcoming crescendo of gift-giving, culminating in the “For the Future” campaign, a fundraising initiative beginning on April 23, 2010. The campaign emphasizes education affordability for students of modest means.


Will the recession impact this year’s donations? Slim personal budgets may cause donors to purchase necessities rather than partake in philanthropy. However, let’s hope our wonderful alumni choose to give back to dear old State.

Posted about 5 years ago in by
soldier
English 497 is a class that most of us will never take. "Narrative, Oral History, New Media Technologies" allows students to document their recent experiences in the Iraq War. Penn State created this course in the spring of 2009 to provide an outlet for those adjusting from military service to college life. According to the class website, "Students gained hands-on experience in documentary filmmaking and oral history interviewing while learning pre- and post-production video techniques." Through videos, writing assignments, and blog posts, the students shared their memories to educate others as well as to examine their experiences on a personal level. Dave Walker, a 28-year-old from Danville, recently took the class and graduated from Penn State. Says Philly.com, "Walker's stylishly produced film tracks the contrasts in attitudes and experiences between an enthusiastic ROTC student looking forward to military service and that of one of Walker's friends who served in Iraq." The students' blogs and videos are available on the website, so check them out if you'd like some personal accounts of the Iraq War.
Posted about 5 years ago in by
Risk
"What if that CATA bus speeds up while I'm crossing the street? What if we have a pop quiz on the one day that I skip class?" As college students, we face risks on a regular basis, but so does the university itself. Penn State Live recently profiled Gary Langsdale, Penn State's resident risk manager. He utilizes a corporate approach called Enterprise Risk Management and leads a team of employees who strive to make Penn State a safer place--in every aspect imaginable. Langsdale defines a risk as "any impediment to accomplishing institutional goals." Such impediments can pertain to data security, laboratory environments, pandemics, student behaviors, weather emergencies, and much more. Langsdale and his team conducted 53 interviews throughout the university and identified over 100 possible risks. The top ten include the dangers of high-risk student drinking, the unique risks presented by running an academic medical center, and maintaining Penn State's reputation and the perceived quality of a Penn State degree. Check out the rest after the jump.
Posted about 5 years ago in by
onward state
Onward State is finally writing about Onward State. How meta. But really, we are pretty awesome. Even the Chronicle of Higher Education approves! The Chronicle ran a story about us on Monday and posted a supplementary video on Thursday. You can read the article HERE and watch the embedded video on this page. The story praises the budding genius of our founder, Davis Shaver, and also emphasizes the importance of assigning editor Eli Glazier (Sadly, my favorite editor, Evan Kalikow, ended up on the Chronicle's cutting room floor, save for a shout-out in the video) (Editor's note: Awwwwwwwww). Although our editors pave the road, let's not forget our writers and photographers, the vehicles that ride this road to journalistic success. We have all earned this honor. In that spirit, we'd like to announce a series of profiles that should hopefully help you put a face on your favorite Onward State writers. For now, check out the Chronicle article and continue enjoying Onward State, one of the nation's most exceptional blogs.
Posted about 5 years ago in by
clizbe

Kent Clizbe isn’t working for the US government or any other organization. He’s one man searching for answers amidst the Climategate controversy. As the Collegian reported this week, Mr. Clizbe sent letters to 27 Penn State faculty members in hopes of locating a snitch whistleblower. He possesses an extensive background in secure communications and has even recruited a lawyer who has experience working with the False Claims Act.


Faculty members who come forward with information about the Climategate controversy will be protected–and apparently well paid. We contacted Mr. Clizbe to understand his motives for launching this personal investigation.

Posted about 5 years ago in by
vodka

After reading a recent roundup of drinking data, I have made the above proclamation. That’s right, you heard it here first.


To understand Penn State’s notorious drinking habits, the university and the county have created “Penn State’s Partnership – Campus and Community United Against Dangerous Drinking.”


Each year, the PSPCCUADD CCUADD Partnership publishes the Annual Assessment Report, which strives to track changes in the levels and consequences of drinking. The new 2009 edition can be found here.

Posted about 5 years ago in by
flynt leverett

When Flynt Leverett isn’t teaching at Penn State or guiding the nation in Washington, he apparently enjoys contributing to the New York Times.


The NY Times recently included this piece by Dr. Leverett and his wife: “Another Iranian Revolution? Not Likely.” In the article, they urge our nation to continue diplomatic relations with Iran, despite the misguided opinion that the Iranian government will collapse. It’s definitely worth reading.


Dr. Leverett currently teaches in the School of International Affairs at Penn State. He also directs the Geopolitics of Energy Initiative at the New America Foundation in Washington and seems to be an all-around important guy.

Posted about 5 years ago in by
search
Can the campus police search your dorm room without a warrant? A startling new ruling suggests “yes.” In 2007, Boston College police officers received a tip that two students were harboring weapons in their dorm room. Three officers and two residence life officials knocked on the students’ door. After some questioning, the students turned over […]
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