Paterno Statue Needed To Be Removed More Than Statues Of Noted White Supremacists, New York Times Poll Says

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In light of recent protests to remove statues of individuals with ties to America’s history of white supremacy, the New York Times surveyed its readers to get a stance on which statues should remain and which should be taken down.

Among explorers, former Presidents, war generals, and other historical figures (all with ties to white supremacy in some shape or form), you’ll never guess which Penn State figure the Times managed to place on the list.

The decision to include a statue that had already been removed in 2012 aside, 82 percent of the more than 28,000 survey takers concluded it was the correct decision to remove Paterno’s statue, tied with those in favor of removing the statue of Roger Taney — the man who wrote the Dred Scott Decision, which ruled that blacks could never be American citizens.

More people surveyed are in favor of removing the Paterno statue than would be in favor of removing the statue of Confederate general Robert E. Lee, who “symbolizes white supremacy and institution of slavery the South sought to defend,” according to the New York Times.

Of the 16 statues included on the list, Joe Paterno’s statue placed third among those the survey takers believe should be removed, or was the correct decision to remove in Paterno’s case.

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Steve Connelly

Steve Connelly is a junior majoring in PR and the Penn State news editor for Onward State. He is a proud native of the state of New Jersey, and yes, he is literal trash. He is a soccer fan, nap enthusiast, and chicken tender connoisseur. He tried to be a photographer once, but the only good thing that came out of it is a name for his future sports bar, The Blurry Zamboni. You can follow him on Twitter @slc2o (feel free to slide) and email him at [email protected]

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