Pennsylvania Voter ID Law Partially Rejected

According to reports, The Pennsylvania voter ID bill, requiring, for the first time, a valid form of photo identification, has been partially rejected by Commonwealth Court Judge Robert Simpson and will not take effect in time for the November 6 election.

Those who show up to vote may still be asked to show a photo ID by poll workers to do so, but will not be turned away if they don’t have the proper photo ID. Last week, it appeared that voters who didn’t have the proper photo ID would have to fill out and submit a provisional ballot within six days of the election. Following today’s decision, this is no longer the case.

The bill has been a political hotbed given the accusations of many on the left that the Republican-supported bill will disproportionally disenfranchise minorities and other traditionally democratic-voting demographic groups. The issue was further politicized when Pennsylvania Rep. Mike Turzai made comments that seem to suggest political objectives.

There remains the possibility that the Pennsylvania State Supreme Court may review the decision. Given the proximity to the election–only 35 days away, this action remains unlikely to be completed by then.

While there still remains the possibility that this decision is overturned and the law does take effect, it is possible that the efforts of the state to rapidly issue photo ID cards, and expiration date stickers on Penn State’s campus will tentatively be put on hold.

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Dave Cole

Dave graduated from Penn State in 2013. He was the Managing Editor of this website. Dave remains a proud Onward State alumnus to this day. Twitter --> @davecolephoto

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