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about a year ago

Drinking on State Patty’s Day? You’re Going to Jail

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If you’re planning to get drunk on State Patty’s Day, are under the age of 21, and would prefer not to spend the night in prison, you might be in for a rough time.

Police will be exercising different procedures during the pseudo-holiday this year, some of which were introduced in the student leader State Patty’s Day video released today.

Fast forward to 1:12 of the video, and we hear the familiar melodious voice of former UPUA president T.J. Bard.

“Police will also be taking all of those charged on State Patty’s Day weekend into custody and before a judge. There, you will be required to post collateral equal to the maximum amount of your fines and court costs, or you can choose to have an immediate hearing,” Bard said.

“If you cannot pay your fines, you may be detained in the Centre County Correctional Facility,” UPUA President Courtney Lennartz added.

Essentially, you can either pay up, be found guilty immediately, or be forced rub up next to serial Palmerton masturbator for the night.

Maximum underage drinking and public drunkenness fines are now $500 for the first offense and $1,000 for the second offense, on top of $150 court costs, so you may be in trouble if you can’t pony up that much cash.

According to Chief of Police Tom King, police will be seeking the maximum penalty for anyone charged during State Patty’s Day weekend, set for February 23 this year. The offense will also stay on your record permanently, as police will not be offering any pretrial expungement programs.

“Police will not be agreeing to any alternative court dispositions like the Youthful Offender Program or other similar programs during State Patty’s Day weekend,” King said.

Be smart out there, Penn State, or that friend you invited from West Virginia might be looking at the concrete all night.

Downtown - Located in Centre County, Pennsylvania, State College is a college town heavily influenced by the campus life of Penn State University and have gained the nickname "Happy Valley" for its resilience during the Great Depression. They say there's something magical about the Nittany Valley, where time just seems to stand still. Read more