UberEATS Has Made Its Way To Penn State — Even On Bike

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Uber announced earlier in the semester that it would be expanding its UberEATS service – which is very much analogous to OrderUp – to 31 college campuses. The food ordering service is now functional in State College, meaning students now have another way to have food delivered to dorms, apartments, or anywhere else.

With UberEATS, hungry customers trying to chow down without the hassle of going out to get the food can order from State College favorites like Irving’s, Sauly Boys, and Primanti Brothers, as well as fast food staples like McDonald’s.

The app itself is sleek and straightforward, and certainly similar to the regular Uber app. Here’s a peak at what the new food delivery service app looks like:

The home screen is well-designed and visually appealing, showing some popular delivery orders in the area. Fiddlehead is certainly never a bad choice.

With UberEATS in town, the competition in the world of food delivery will continue to heat up. One particular student, Jarred Price, has pioneered a new approach to food delivery in State College: on his bike.

“I was drawn to UberEATS through their extensive marketing campaign that they conducted on campus the week before the beta for the app launched, with people leaving promotional flyers for the delivering for UberEATS on bike handles,” Price said. “Before I saw the flyer on my bicycle for biking for UberEATS, I had never thought of doing something similar to being a bike courier.”

Anyone who has biked around State College or on campus knows it’s not the easiest task. But it can be even more difficult when you’re on a tight schedule and you’re facing the unpredictable weather of State College.

“Some challenges that I face delivering on my bike versus delivering in a car is largely the weather,” Price said. “Anyone who has lived in State College for any time knows that the weather in the region is not the most cooperative, especially during the winter.”

Price added he always keeps an extra set of clothes with him, because you really never know which way the State College weather may turn. This Penn Stater also realizes a big order could pose some problems.

“I can strap a large insulated bag to a carrier rack on the back of my bike, but that can only carry so much. If I end up with an order that can’t all fit in the bag, I’ll have to figure that out when I get to it,” he said.

Using a bike to deliver food for UberEATS certainly has its pros, though. For example, navigating around town and on campus via bike is actually pretty quick, especially compared to driving on gameday weekends when the streets are backed up.

Price explained that when you start delivering for UberEATS, you’re an considered independent contractor, which means you must provide your own gear for deliveries. You can use any bike you want and transport the food in whatever container works best for you. Price has opted for a rear carrier on his bike, on top of which he ties down a large insulated delivery bag.

“An incentive that UberEATS provides is they increase the fares that you will receive while delivering during certain times that are predicted to be busy,” Price said. “These increased fares are paid out of pocket by Uber at no additional cost to the customer. UberEATS also gives monetary rewards for completing a certain number of deliveries in a set amount of time and this is also paid for by Uber at no expense to the customer.”

These monetary incentives — along with the flexible schedule that delivering provides — are just what Jarred Price is looking for, even if it means delivering on two wheels.

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Derek Bannister

Derek is a sophomore majoring in Economics and History. He is legally required to tell you that he's from right outside of Philly. He is an aspiring stay-at-home dad but has yet to develop any of the skills necessary for such an endeavor. Email Derek compliments at [email protected]

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