Day: February 9, 2012

President T.J. Bard Unveils Six Points for Change

Among the usual banter and uselessness that most UPUA meetings encompass, the Presidential remarks last night from T.J. Bard were a refreshing example of leadership. Bard introduced “6 Points for Change” for the Penn State administration. Signed by T.J. Bard of UPUA, Pete Khoury of CCSG, and Jon Lozano of GSA, the six points advocate for more student involvement in the way the University operates.

Umphrey’s McGee Brings Great Vibes To The State Theatre

The State Theatre was greeted with one of the greatest jam bands in the business Wednesday night. Umphrey’s McGee, a Chicago-based jam band from the 90s, took to the downtown venue and played a show that won’t be forgotten for awhile. Check out details on the concert after the jump.

Penn State Basketball Loses Fifth Straight

It has not been a fun twenty days for the Penn State basketball squad. Last night in East Lansing, Penn State (10-15, 2-10) lost their fifth straight game, falling to Michigan State 77-57.

“Until Our Voices Are Heard” – The Vagina Monologues 2012 Preview

As a part of the first annual “Women’s Empowerment Week,” the Lambda Theta Alpha Latin Sorority, Inc. is presenting three showings of “The Vagina Monologues” on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday.

Last Call for THON Dancer Mail

Today is the last day to turn in dancer mail to the Mail Call office in 324 HUB. You can find out all the details to help to get those last minute letters in after the jump.

Super Bowl Ring Eludes Bill O’Brien

After storming past the Broncos and getting by the Ravens, the worst nightmare scenario became reality on Sunday night. Bill O’Brien lost his final game as part of the Patriots staff. The hope in Happy Valley is that it will not indirectly lead to actual losses for Penn State in the future.

Onward Debates: Private State University

The Morrill Land Grant Act of 1862 is one of my favorite pieces of legislation.

A Congress atrophied by the Civil War sent a bill to President Lincoln that, when signed in to law, changed the face of tertiary education in America. In a research report I did in seventh grade about Penn State, discussion of the Morrill Act took up more pages than it probably should have. It made a higher education both affordable and valuable to the common man. This was an Act designed not to increase the number of scholars of law or divinity, but of botany, agriculture, and the “mechanical arts.”

Penn State became one of the nation’s first land grant institutions.

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